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'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
. "first look" is up next. >>> desperate measures. the world watches and waits as japan tries to contain its nuclear crisis. survival instinct, incredible new video of heroic rescues during the craftic tsunami. and royal jewel, the see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a whopping sum. good morning. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more on "first look" on msnbc. today, we begin with a race against the clock. japan is desperately trying to reconnect power to critical cooling systems at the fukushima power plant. this as smoke has once again been seen rising from the crippled nuclear facility. today high-capacity fire engines are blasting tons of water into the hot zone, an unexplained switch from yesterday's air attacks. >> reporter: tons of water, the difference between salvation and catastrophe at japan's stricken nuclear plant. >> the situation remains very serious. but there's been no significant worsening since yesterday. >> reporter: the cloud billowing from the fukushima daichi plant on wednesday was all but gone thursday, but the possibility of a meltdown is still
will this nuclear crisis in japan get? all four reactors at the fukushima plant are damaged terrifying the local population. people are evacuating the area and even moving away from cities as far away as tokyo. out of 800 workers on the site of the nuclear plants, 50 are still there. only 50 and they are in a very dangerous situation. we'll get a report on the ground on how serious the situation is and what it could mean for americans here at home. >>> plus, how much radiation can anyone be exposed to before risking significant health problems? we'll talk to the experts about how much is too much. >>> i'm going to talk to the weather channel of all people about which direction the winds are now blowing and who is in harm's way. also no surprise here, calling for yet another war. this time it's libya. neocons are asking for a no-fly zone to force gadhafi from power. >>> if a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, how will little knowledge affect michelle bachmann's chances. even well known politician have scant knowledge of their own country's history. we start with the crisis in japan. david alb
the plume was coming and people were talking about it on the united states. but here in japan there are amounts that are significant enough to cause concern. as long as the reactors keep leaking, especially if it gets worse we will hear a lot of reports about contamination we. >> we will go burbank in just a second. do you have reports about what is being done to get the leaking nuclear reactors under control? do you know the latest? >> today has been the most encouraging news yet. there is electricity at two of the reactors and they are going to start in the next few hours to see if they can turn the pumps back on. and one of the reactors, the fire trucks we have seen, shot enough water, 1500 gallons of it today alone to fill up the tanks and cover the damaged fuel rods. that's big. and even bigger at two other reactors, diesel power generators have got the circulating system up and running. and that is actually brought measured temperatures down. so officials have cautiously optimistic that they are beginning to get this thing under control. and it's a race against time beca
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
rock in new york city. japan is working to contain a humanitarian nuclear and economic crisis. three days after getting hit by a devastating earthquake and tsunami. the pictures still so dramatic. right now, rescue workers are searching for survivors. largely in the country's coastal towns. where this morning, police say the death toll is mounting. in all, more than 10,000 people are estimated dead. millions of residents are still without power, and clean drinking water. the japanese coast is also been struck by more than 100 aftershocks. 150 aftershocks since friday alone. the latest one, a 6.2-magnitude quake followed by a new tsunami scare. only a scare today. safety concerns are lingering over growing problems at nuclear facility. earlier today, 11 people were hurt when a second hydrogen explosion rocked a nuclear plant that sent a column of smoke into the air. that blast was felt 25 miles away. but the plant's operator says radiation levels are fortunately still within the legal limits. >>> meanwhile, the u.s. now says it's moved its ships and aircraft away from one of the quake
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
. frightening moments for some workers at that troubled nuclear power plant in japan. what made them flee for their lives. >>> searching for spring. unseasonably cold weather puts a chill on the cherry blossoms and many areas of this country. >>> and summer breeze. why it might be a whole lot easier to find a summer job in twlechbt. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." let's get to what's happening right now beginning with new this morning. robert gates says the obama administration has no plans to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's somet
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
>> couric: tonight, two weeks into japan's disaster and it just keeps getting worse. the death toll passes 10,000 and now there may be a breach in one of the nuclear reactors. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the united states may be giving up command of the libya mission, but american forces will still be playing a major role in the operation. the fire that woke up the country to dangers in the workplace. and a population explosion. the colorful comeback of the monarch butterfly. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan's prime minister says the nuclear crisis is far from over and the goal right now, he says, is simply to keep it from getting worse. but it did today with a possible breach of one of the reactors. it was two weeks ago that they were damaged when a magnitude nine earthquake shook northern japan and triggered a tsunami. the official death toll passed the 10,000 mark today. 17,000 people are still missing. and now the japanese government has expande
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
nuear site in japan, the power has been restored. they warn it will take days and weeks before they can turn it on. >>> tim pawlenty explores a run in 2012. >>> four former president's together honors one, a rare washington tribute to bush. >>> they are trying to extend the no-fly zone west towards tripoli. jim maceda is live in the libyan capital. bring us up to date as to what happened overnight and this morning. >> reporter: well, yeah, there are a lot of moving parts right now, andrea. first of all, a little more detail on the f-15 crash. that occurred 24 miles east of benghazi. the two pilots are now in safe u.s. hands. that is a rebel controlled part of the country. all of the loyalists or the forces loyal to the regime pulled back from benghazi when the air strike started two days ago and are now about the new front line is about 80 miles south of benghazi. the plane shall as you mentioned, went down due to mechanical failure. it was not gunfire. the plane completely destroyed in the crash. the two pilots managed to pair shoot out. they landed in two separate fields. again, they
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
in japan where today a radiation misreading at the fukushima plant sparked panic as well as evacuation. officials are now calling it a big mistake. charles hadlock is covering the latest developments from nearby, a safe distance, we should note, in south korea. charles, that misreading sparked another evacuation at the plant earlier today. are workers back inside? what is the status at fukushima daiichi right now? >> reporter: well, it was a major miscalculation, peter. a worker was reading the gauges and misrepresented what he saw. he reported he saw a spike of radiation equal to 10 million times what is normal. that turned out to be a miscalculation, and the tokyo electric company, the operators of the fukushima plant, had to back off and say, wait a minute, that's a miscalculation. it's not that bad. it is bad but not that bad. now, how bad is it? well, that water, that pool of water that is around the four reactors there is so radioactive that some radiologists tell me that workers standing in the water for one hour is exposed to four times his annual amount of radiation. so is tha
since tuesday in libya could be released today if libyan officials are to be believed. >>> in japan today, the nuclear crisis is upgraded to level five as authorities try everything to avert a nuclear meltdown. the government now admits it is overwhelmed. >>> plus california lieutenant governor gavin newsom with us on his state's response to the quake and tsunami. >>> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama will be delivering a statement on libya at 2:00 eastern at the white house after meeting with top lawmakers in the situation room. it will be the president's first comments since the u.n. authorized military intervention late last night. france and britain are making plans to send their jets to the region. italy has made its bases available. nato is meeting today in brussels to determine if it will lead any military operations against gadhafi's forces. today secretary clinton said that the world had no threat but to threaten gadhafi to stop his brutal crackdown against the rebels and libyan civilians. nbc's jim maceda is live in tripoli. we've heard so m
, will be david gregory's guests. we take you to japan. nuclear crisis getting worse. officials saying they believe there's a breach in the reactor core of unit number three at the damaged fukushima plant. what that means is that more radiation than first thought could be leaking right now. the suspected breach found when two workers were burned whi eed wading into water, 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. there may be a crack in the core or the spent fuel rod pool. all work has since stopped at the plant and japan's prime minister is saying the situation is very grave and the government is not in a position to be optimistic. joining me live from seoul, soesoe soek. >> reporter: good afternoon, as you say, the government did announce today that they -- what they think is happening is there there is a leak. they were cautious not to use the word breach because they're not clear where the source is coming from that affected the workers that you mentioned who were hospitalized yesterday. two of those workers, there were three altogether hospitalized, two of the workers were sent o
. i'm thomas roberts. we start in japan where there have been reports of a suspected breach in the core of reactor three. workers were pulled out of the complex as a safety precaution while the possibility of more radiation leaks over that region. japan's prime minister called this situation, quote, very grave and serious during a press conference that was hours after this setback. he reassured the citizens that nuclear techs and the government are taking a cautious approach in each step of this process. >>> the death toll from the dual disasters that rocked the nation continue to rise. more than 10,000 are dead and still 17,000 missing residents. nbc's lee cowan is live in tokyo this morning. lee, what are we hearing right now about the fukushima plant and any kind of extension as a precaution to the japanese exclusion zone for the potential of radiation? >> reporter: well, thomas, there is an extension, although it's still voluntary at this point. the people that were told 19 miles out, 20 miles out that they were told to basically stay indoors over the last couple weeks,
. appreciate your time. >>> in japan, a shortage of bottled water. a live report next. nobody in my family ever had a heart attack. if anything, i thought i'd get hit by a bus, but not a heart. all of a sudden, it's like an earthquake going off in your body. my doctor put me on an aspirin regimen to help protect my life. [ male announcer ] aspirin is not appropriate for everyone. so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. to my friends, i say, you know, check with your doctor, 'cause it can happen to anybody. [ male announcer ] be ready if a heart attack strikes. donate $5 to womenheart at, and we'll send you this bayer aspirin pill tote. s it hit helps the lhe of companipanies like the she smallestt ofof th ththat lets yos your employeloy, pa and custcustomersvate and sharee so you can can unleash tsh the of your mor your peopleople. ou but your wrinkles don't. ♪ introducing neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it has the fastest retinol formula available. in fact, it's clinically proven to smooth wrinkles in just one week. so all you h
's happening. fallout, more traces of radiation found in america from that crippled nuclear plan in japan. is the threat to the u.s. and the world growing? murderous attacksing libyan forces answer president obama's address with a new round of attacks on civilians, according to the rebels. >>> and camelot, it's not. the new miniseries on jfk and jackie o., many historians say it's more fiction than fact. we speak to the producer 0 of the series ahead. >>> good afternoon. we begin with the disaster in japan where the prime minister says the country is in a stalts of maximum alert, this as the fukushima crisis worsens. japan officials have said they believe there's been a partial meltdown at three of the plants' six reactors, that's half. now today radioactive water has been discovered in the maintenance tunnel at the plant. in a a spatefrtepha fr l io ocns e nd ncte peltoeer he nnoced 2 etrothor nd, stonrm plonm seepifr the damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside the facility. plutonium is years. but so far, officials claim the levels found are not harmful to human health. meanw
,000 people there. meanwhile in japan, another set back in the effort to control the japanese doubled fukushima plant. there are high levels of radioactive elements in the water there. there is more efforts to pump fresh water in the reactor there. dominic? >>reporter: uma, that's right. u.s. forces and japan getting involved. the navy has two naval barges loaded with 550,000 gallons of fresh water to be pumped in the plant. they are making it up to deliver the water. the united states air force is using c130 to deliver 500 tons was freshh bottled water up to sendai, close to the plantt where there are difficulties getting uncontaminated supplies of water and helping out the public there. the air force based out of the air base west of tokyo, home to 306,000 servicemen who are caught up in this as much as the japanese citizens. >> japp -- japan is our ally and our home. when something happen to japan and we are able to help we are glad to. we raised our hands to say yes, we can help you out. >> the utilit company said the water is contained. but the government is not sure if they are
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
, in a reactor core, as japan faces a true nuclear catastrophe. workers burned by 10,000 times normal radiation. will parts of japan now be lost for generations? >>> in this country, superbug. growing concern this morning over a brand-new drug-resistant bacteria taking hold in california hospitals. is it on the move? dr. besser is standing by right here this morning. >>> crowning glory. this beauty queen wins her crown back in a highly publicized trial, after losing it because she was accused of being too fat. told to lay off the tacos. she's here live after her victory. >>> and put your paws up, going gaga this morning for polar cubs. two, new polar bears take the world stage. they're already capturing the world's heart. >>> good morning, again, everyone. thanks for spending the week with us. it's been good having david muir here with us. we're going to get to japan in a moment. >> so much breaking news this morning. >>> we're also tracking a story we broke at abc news. an air traffic controller working alone and asleep on the job at a major airport as two planes were landing. this morning, we
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
gadhafi actually survive? >>> plus a top nuclear scientist says the disaster over in japan reminds us over here that the nuclear industry over here in the united states has gained control of the agency, which is supposed to regulate it. the nuclear regulatory commission. in other words, in the nrc, the foxes are guarding the hen house. how do we fix this baby? >>> and the juiciest story of the day for "hardball." it's now likely that michelle bauchmann will launch a exploratory committee. but she says she hasn't decided whether or not to run or not for the president. when was the last time anybody watch canning remember someone forming an exploratory committee running for president and not actually running? by the way, didn't we create her here? let's all thank sarah palin for setting us straight. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is now about to speak. we're breaking here, breaking news. let's listen to her live. >> 1907 and 1972 and protect the civilians of libya. events have moved very quickly. so let's be clear about where we stand and how we got here. when the libyan people sough
we were paying $2.82 a gallon. that's almost 75 cen cheaper. >>> now to japan where workers have reconnected power lines to all three reactors, but there is still a great to do before the power can be turned on. the hope is then the cooling systems would work properly. meantime, "new york times" is reporting that up gentlemanen's government approved a ten-year extension for the oldest of six reactors at that power station. just a month before the big earthquake, despite safety warnings. nbc's bob bazzell joins me. what's the latest? >> it look likes they may have turned the corner in the battle to get that under control. yesterday seemed to be a bad day. one of the storage pools was very hot and the radiation readings was as high as they've been in the accident. but the radiation levels have come down, there's electricity to all the reactors, but it can't be turned on yet. it will be a while before they get them going, but it seems like the trend is in the direction that everyone wants it to be, but there could still be a lot of surprises ahead. in the disaster zone there's still
into an end game that doesn't overcommit us when we're already committed now? we've got this crisis in japan we're trying to help with, etc. so we are stretched thin. >> reporter: general and michael, thank you very much. >> thanks, shannon. >>> well, a leading figure of the libyan opposition movement has released a statement praising coalition forces for military action against qaddafi's regime. ththe pribs's family prince's fd from libya after the coup said the international community should help libya move forward. he said the libyan people cry out to the world to champion their rally for freedom and democracy. steve harrigan and rick leventhal have been provided around the clock coverage. steve was on the air as air strikes hit the area. you can follow that and catch all the developments in libya as military action continues. just log onto >>> well, a glimmer of hope in such a tragic story in japan. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy were rescued from the wreckage of a house in northeastern japan nine days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami. both of them were wea
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
. >>> there are new radiation concerns in japan this morning. the country's nuclear crisis stretches into the third week. officials said today that highly radioactive iodine seeping from the fukushima nuclear complex may be making its way into seawater north of the plant. mounting obstacles like inadequate storage tanks where efforts have been hindered to bring the facility back from disaster. the water must be removed and safely stored before work can continue to power up the cooling system. they just don't know how long that's going to take before they can get the workers into the plant. adding to the sense of unease across japan, a strong earthquake shook the region today and prompted a brief tsunami alert. measured a magnitude 6.5 and no damage or injuries were reported. radiation from japan appears to have reached as far as the u.s. east coast at least in trace amounts. one sample of massachusetts rainwater registered very low concentrations of radiation. officials say it does not pose a health risk. very latest, let's bring in nbc's lee cowan in tokyo. what's the latest there? >> reporter: we
that have happened around the world, it is facing more conflict plus japan which may be the largest issue that we're facing. >> andrea, it is unbelievable. i repeated to him, the associated press lead, we were on the air doing wrap-up from his speech the other night and they obviously had this set to go. they hit send. and their lead contained the words president obama defended the first war launched on his watch. i left the interview and you've been around this so many times yourself, and i passed through what i called the machinery of the presidency. the security, the aides, there was the tall air force officer serving as the military de you look at his feet. there is theootbal all of the people flew in with him. he has these three plates, balancing on sticks right now. americans in uniform fighting on at least three fronts. that leaves out special forces that are dug into places we can't imagine. and it is quite a world view, i guess, and are we entering this period of kind of ad libbed on the fly foreign policy where these nations are changing in north africa and the middle east befor
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
unfolding, japan. there's new radiation showing up in food and water in the aftermath of the tsunami, the earthquake. much more of our coverage from japan. we'll have a live report and from libya when we come back. and here's what we did today: we put almost three million americans to work... ...adding nearly 400 billion dollars to the economy. generated over two and a half million kilowatts of electricity... ...enough energy to power a quarter of america. we gave your kids a cleaner ride to school. kept the lights on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. l
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
controller who has been suspended. >>> ahead, our first look at workers inside japan's crippled nuclear plant who are trying to prevent that meltdown, two of them now hospitalized. we'll tell you what happened. plus, a massive firebreaks out at miami's international airport. flights have been affected by this. what happened here? incredible video. >>> michele bachmann, step closer to making an announcement on her potential presidential aspirations for 2012. what she said a short time ago.e running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. the morning after the big move starts with back pain... and a choice. take advil now... and maybe up to 4 in a day. or, choose aleve and 2 pills for a day free of pain. smart move. ♪ >>> wk back to "news nation." take a look at this raging fire early this morning at miami international airport. the blaze at the fuel depot finally brought under control. dozens of flights in and out of miami
're expecting that announcement at 3:00 eastern time. >>> still touch and go at japan's nuclear power plant, but they're still structure ally sound. smoke started rising from reactor numbers two and three. the smoke eventually stopped. the plant operator says it's not clear what started the smoke in the first place. >>> the just is making potassium iodide to u.s. personnel in tokyo and abu ghraib, trophy pictures of soldiers posing with bodies of afghan civiliance. what possibly could the military say to explain it? >>> plus it's a list no parent wants to see their teen's name on. and the latest case of cyber bullying. >>> a dramatic rescue of an entire family including a six month old puppy. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange
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